10 Things a Homeowner Wants to Know Before Hiring a General Contractor

Homeowners usually talk to a few different general contractors before they choose the person who will lead their new home build or renovation project. And these are the 10 most common things potential clients want to know before they decide who to hire for the job. Be prepared with this information in order to win the new business time after time.

1. How Long You’ve Been in Business

First things first: before homeowners will ask you specifics about a building project, they’ll want to know that you’re coming from a place of experience. If you’ve been a GC for decades, the number of years you’ve been in business will speak for itself. If you’re newer to the building industry, reassure potential clients about your capabilities by telling them how many projects similar to (or more complex than) their own you’ve completed recently to the homeowner’s satisfaction. 

2. Other Homeowners Will Vouch for Your Work

Many clients will find you based on the recommendation of a friend, neighbor, coworker, or family member. But they’ll also want a few additional referrals who will speak to your proven track record of success. Keep an updated list of satisfied homeowners handy so you’re always ready to give potential new clients the names of people you’ve worked with in the past — ideally those whose projects have been similar to their own.

3. You Are Licensed, Bonded, and Insured

Homeowners will want to ensure that you’re licensed to work in their area, and that they won’t be held financially liable if a member of your crew is injured on the job. So have copies of your license, certificate of insurance, and bonds at the ready so your new clients know that you’re covered for all contingencies.

4. Your Bid is the Best

Most likely, the homeowner will have shopped around and gotten bids from a few different general contractors. So be prepared for them to ask questions about how your bid compares to others. If your bid isn’t the lowest, you may have to explain that the lowest bid is not always the best. Reassure them that you priced your bid fairly with the lowest cost to them, without cutting any corners or skimping on materials.

5. What They Can Expect Day-to-Day

Give potential clients an overview of what the work site will look like on a daily basis. That includes what hours work will be going on, whether or not construction will continue on weekends, if the crew will need access to areas other than the designated workspace (including bathrooms and break areas), and if they should expect to be without water or power over the course of the project.

8. Who Will be at the Site and How They’ll be Supervised

Likewise, homeowners want to know who other than you will be in their home. Tell them what subcontractors and crew will be there during the project, and how often you’ll be on-site to supervise. 

6. Timeline for Completion

A realistic timeline is one of the most important aspects of a project, especially for homeowners who are living in the space during renovations. Give the homeowner the rundown on both how soon you’d be able to start the job, as well as a detailed timeline for the project from kickoff to final inspection.

7. Payment Schedule

As you no doubt know firsthand, when and how much GCs get paid can vary widely. So let the homeowner know upfront what they should plan for in terms of payment arrangements. Tell them what percentage of the project costs will be due as a down payment before work kicks off, how much will be due while construction is underway, and finally what the remainder is that will be due when work is complete. 

9. How You’ll Give Status Reports

Establish with the client the best way for the two of you to communicate (be it text, email, or phone), and if you’ll check in with them with quick daily status updates or longer weekly face-to-face meetings.

10. That You Communicate Well

Finally, one of the most important things a homeowner wants to know before choosing their contractor is that they’ll be able to communicate with the person easily throughout the sometimes-stressful building or remodeling process. First-time homeowners or nervous remodelers may have a lot of questions for you from the get-go. But keep in mind that your clear, confident and helpful answers will assure them from the start that you’re the right person for the job.